#18 Days In Egypt, a crowd-sourced documentary project

#18 Days In Egypt, a crowd-sourced documentary project

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak resigned on the 1st of February 2011 after 18 long days of protests and uprisings. The gatherings in Tahrir Square became stronger each day as the Egyptians were all united against the regime. However, it is important to take the role played by social networks once again. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr mobilised a large number of people worldwide, Egyptians and non-Egyptians.

For more than three weeks, Egyptians documented their own revolution through photos, facebook posts, tweets, sms’s and videos. All first-hand accounts remain scattered across the Internet. This is what inspired Jigar Mehta, journalist and filmmaker to create a website called #18 days in Egypt together with Yasmine Elayat, interaction designer and software programmer and Alaa Dajani, documentary filmmaker.

This site intends to be an archive of the rich content of these 18 days and will consist of the varying media (videos, photos, audio) created by protesters on the ground in Egypt. Mehta, who hopes to turn his project into a documentary, describes 18 Days in Egypt as a “crowd sourced archive and documentary project.”



For more information:
http://18daysinegypt.com
 

Related Posts

An ignored resistance

19/05/2015

resistence 110One of the most overlooked episodes of the Second World War, the Romani Resistance, is commemorated on 16 May.

Slow Food Turkey: Wheat Rites

18/10/2012

slow_110The Princes' Islands are the tourist destination for those who want to leave behind the frenzy of the immense metropolis on the Bosporus. These islands have been for millennia a laboratory of cultural contamination, as testified by recipes, smells, tastes, and words.

Behind the wall

19/06/2011

Behind the wallIn the Balkans the era of bloody conflicts is over. But instead of proceeding along the difficult path of dialogue, many are scrambling to raise walls to keep the "other" at a safe distance. And even the European Union doesn't seem immune from such temptations. A comment