Turkish Roma celebrate Kakava Fest

kakava 545a

Turkish Thracian cities hosted the Romani feast of "Kakava" on May 5 and 6.

Believed to be related with the Turkish "Hıdrellez" and Orthodox St George's Day, Kakava also heralds the spring. Kakava ("caldron" in Romanes language) Fest is celebrated with a feast of lamb or goat meat, music, dance and a huge bonfire. Typically, families gather around water sources and release their wish-papers in the river or the spring. With the first rays of the sun, the revelers head to the river where they wash their face, a ritual believed to bring health and prosperity.

kakava545b

The local Kakava fest has turned into an international festival in the city of Edirne, a Turkish city with a large Roma population. This year's festival was inaugurated by the mayor and the governor of the city, with the mayor Recep Gürkan saying, "Kakava is a Romani tradition. A Roma started the first Kakava bonfire a thousand years ago".

Although a local Romani festival, the event now attracts thousands of people from other cities, eager to experience the festive spring salutation. Kakava, included in the UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List, is vying for a permanent entry in the list.

kakava 545c 


 

 

 

 

 

Related Posts

Hong Kong: standing between giants

23/01/2006

Hong Kong: standing between giantsFor those who are wondering what it would be like to live in Hong Kong, it is like a quiet university town where despite their great numbers, the students never form noisy crowds. As I wandered around I asked myself just where these seven million inhabitants had gone to. Where was the crowded chaos of a metropolis like Cairo?

The rhetoric of radicalisation: Mosques in Italy

19/12/2008

The rhetoric of radicalisation: Mosques in ItalyToday Muslim places of worship can host less than 8% of the Muslims residing in Italy. Despite this figure, the construction of a new mosque or the opening of a prayer hall still stirs up controversy.

A celebration of Arab and Kurdish cultures in Arbil (Part I)

18/07/2007

A celebration of Arab and Kurdish cultures in Arbil (Part I)As the school’s headmaster, Professor Lutfi, took us on a tour of the town in his BMW, he showed us the site where the vast new airport was to be built. We could have guessed as much ourselves: everywhere in this far-flung town they were rushing to create what hadn’t existed before