The Other Hundred

//Photo: Aydın Çetinbostanoğlu

//Photo: Aydın Çetinbostanoğlu

Kerem Alar, a 25 year old Roma musician from Turkey, is one of the 100 men and women all around the world that made it to "The Other Hundred" book.

"The Other Hundred" is a non-profit photo-book project realized by the Global Institute For Tomorrow (GIFT). The book, which can be seen as an alternative to "the top 100" lists prepared regularly by prominent media publications, celebrates the stories of 100 persons from 95 countries. The stories that are mosty ignored by the mainstream media...

And Kerem Alar's story is as such:

"He plays solo at weddings and other events, such as henna nights, where brides prepare for their weddings by decorating themselves with temporary tattoos. 
On such occasions, he can earn around US$100 for a day’s work – good money for a member of the Roma community. The work is irregular, usually occurring only on weekends between May and September. 
When he is not performing, Kerem works in a factory. For many Roma in Turkey jobs are hard to come by. Collecting recyclable materials or being a musician are two common ways of making a living. 
Sometimes Kerem performs by himself. At other events a small group of friends accompanies him playing tambourines, darboukas, and other types of traditional drums. His goals are to make music his main source of income and earn enough to buy a house where he can live with his wife and children."

//Kerem’s younger brother, sahin, though still at school, also wants to be a musician like his brother. (Photo: Aydın Çetinbostanoğlu)


hunderd 150

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related Posts

Grandeur and digressions of Turkish cinema

26/05/2006

Grandeur and digressions of Turkish cinemaWe can now legitimately dare to hope beyond hope. Talk about the renaissance over the past few years has not been in vain. The revival of Turkish cinema is being consolidated and laying down roots. Even the most evil weeds thrive in this fertile soil. Everyman’s ambition has a place here: from the sincere to the perverse. The best and worse of Turkish films rub shoulders on the same screens. Surely this is a sign of vigour, if not of good health.

Interview with film director and critic Engin Ayça

13/04/2007

Interview with film director and critic Engin AyçaInterview with film director and critic Engin Ayça Engin Ayça greets us in his flat, a welcoming home with a view on the Galata tower on one side, and the Golden Horn on the other. The walls are covered with drawings, paintings, photos and caricatures; the polished furniture and the cats dozing on the sofas are in tune with the old-fashioned atmosphere of this place, and with the warm hospitality he offers to guests. Engin’s good-nature is mitigated by his long white patriarchal beard. “For a long time I felt I was a complete European”, he reveals while pouring some delicious wine in our glasses.

Mobility of artworks instead of artists

11/11/2010

Mobility of artworks instead of artistsFanzines from various countries, in which people expressed themselves were gathered in the exhibition "even my mom can make a book". The exhibition is taking place in Kuledibi, a district in Istanbul considered to be at the crossroads of cultures.