Sahara Rocks

sahara 545yt

“The Saharan Society is changing fast. Most populated cities such as Tamanrasset or Timbuktu are microcosms revealing all the problems of those former touristic regions: threats of violence, trafficking, illegal migration, and new pressure on cultural and natural heritage.

One way Saharan and Tuareg youth have tried to escape these tribulations has been the crafting of a new culture, centered around cybercafés, mobile phones, festivals and “soirées guitares” celebrating their guitar heroes, the “Ishumar”, such as Tinariwen, Terakaft, Bombino, and Tamikrest.

In their songs they celebrate the link between the desert nature, old poetry, saharan culture and of course women, whose role is essential in their society. Some texts act as a call for rebellion, but mainly they are calls for a self consciousness of their people, of their identity.

For 15 years, I have regularly travelled to the Sahara. I often met with musicians or their relatives, so they’re my first contact with the society. I try, through my reports and documentaries, to share what they show me of the modern-day Sahara.

 

Up until now, my projects have been completely self-funded via film productions, exhibitions, publications and radio documentaries. With the funding collected I will be able to complete the “Sahara Rocks!” project, to make the two more trips to the Sahara that will allow me to finish this project and publish a book.”

 


 

EB ver ara ENGArnaud Contreras

 

 

 

 

 

Related Posts

Sleepless in Algiers

03/03/2011

Sleepless in AlgiersThe title of short story anthology Algiers, When the Town is Asleep sounds like a tribute to John Huston’s feature movie The Asphalt Jungle from 1950. But, this is only an excuse, “to describe the city of Algiers in a way that avoids commonplace language.” The Algerian capital is too often depicted as a motionless seaside statue, indifferent to its own wounds.

The Algerian government wants to eliminate small political parties

12/07/2007

The Algerian government wants to eliminate small political partiesIf participation in the 17 May 2007 parliamentary elections was listless, it was because the profusion of ‘small lists’ confused the electorate and discredited the ballot—at least so say the FLN and the RND, Algeria’s two government parties. Naturally, their miracle solution is to eliminate the small political parties that make up the competition. It’s a move that only reinforces growing dissatisfaction with the political process, a disaffection that has already extracted its price from Algeria’s main parties as support dwindles alarmingly for one and stagnates for the other.

Al-Qaeda in Algeria

12/11/2007

Al-Qaeda in AlgeriaLast month, Yassin Temlali interviewed Hamid Layachi, an expert on Algerian Islamist movements. After the terrible tragedy in Algeria we publish again this article to better understand the new phenomenom called “al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb.”