Being in love at 20 years old

FEATURES: 20's years old in love. What do they want from Life? Features: Women, to be 20 in the Mediterranean
They are called, Amal, Lila, Joëlle, Ghania, Celia, Doris… They are 20 years old and live in the Mediterranean. They accepted to meet our journalists to speak about love....and more. Their answers are part of our first series of features on young women in the Mediterranean.
FEATURES: 20's years old in love. What do they want from Life? ALGERIA: Love at 20: a battle against taboos
By their silences, their brief answers and their exuberance, young Algerian women express their strong will to break free from the stranglehold of religion and tradition.
FEATURES: 20's years old in love. What do they want from Life? EGYPT: Egyptian Mothers' influence
If there is one thing that unites young Egyptian women in their twenties today it is that they are generally more articulate in expressing themselves than their mothers' and grandmothers' generation
FEATURES: 20's years old in love. What do they want from Life? FRANCE: Young women come out of the dark
Forty years have passed since the sexual revolution started on May ’68. How do young women in their 20’s live love today? Seven among them, students or workers coming from all parts of France, have accepted to speak to us about their love life. Intimate secrets.
FEATURES: 20's years old in love. What do they want from Life? ITALY: The feminists’ inheritors
They live different realities but almost all, with two exceptions, have place the word “love” on top of their scale of values. Yet they don’t dream of the white dress; “marriage” has a very low rating, whereas having children is everyone’s dream for the future
FEATURES: 20's years old in love. What do they want from Life? LEBANON: a “Secret” Emancipation
In a multi- denominational State like the Lebanon, you would believe that cultural differences are essentially linked to religion. But that would be too simple. In this country the issue of women emancipation transcends denominational rifts.
FEATURES: 20's years old in love. What do they want from Life? MOROCCO: Between survival and self-assertion
2008, 4 years have passed since the reform of the Family Code. Casablanca, a population of 3.5 million (officially), economic capital and melting pot of ancient resident and rural populations who have come to seek employment, of middle classes … Amal, Leyla, Ikram, Ghanya, Amina and Kawtar live their twenties here. Their priority: to work.
FEATURES: 20's years old in love. What do they want from Life? To Risk Love in Palestine
Despite the culture of disapproval and the fact that punishment can reach murder or reclusion, love is still worth the risk in Palestine.
FEATURES: 20's years old in love. What do they want from Life? SPAIN: Neither Conchita, nor Femme Fatale
Neither Conchita, nor femme fatale… Only a few decades have passed since the era of Franco and women’s conditions in Spain have witnessed quite a change.
FEATURES: 20's years old in love. What do they want from Life? TURKEY: The country of “child women”
In Turkey, women are “children” to the day they marry, and then they become “mothers.” That is why Turkey is the country of children of all ages, including mothers aged 15 or 16. But where are the women?

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