Not in my country, Joe Sacco

 

The Maltese American journalist and cartoonist who combines so well reportage and comics, Joe Sacco has just published his graphic novel dealing with immigration issues in Malta entitled Not in my country . He is well known for his past works on international issues such as the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in the Middle East as well the past war in Bosnia-Herzegovina.
Not in my country, Joe Sacco
In this 12 page graphic novel, Joe Sacco observes the way the Maltese handle the influx in irregular immigrants arriving on the island and also how they are treated by the local government and by the Maltese population. Once again, Joe Sacco doesn’t take a clear stand and manages to remain at a perspective with regards to the subject of his novel even if he presents reality from his own eyes. He presents the different voices and leaves any conclusions and reflections up to the reader.

His new work featured in the Guardian on the 17th of July 2010:
www.guardian.co.uk

Debate with Joe Sacco at the Walker Art Center, Minnessota, US:
www.youtube.com/watch

 


 

Information gathered by Elizabeth Grech

 

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