60 second video for a (self)-portrait

  60 second video for a (self)-portrait The one minutes foundation is a non profit organization stimulating the making and showing of audio-visual works that last exactly one minute. The one minutes foundation realizes television programs, exhibitions, presentations in participating countries, award festivals, dvd-releases, lectures, workshops, internet tv, websites and projects for mobile phones.

Theoneminutes Jr launched some years ago, has already produced more than 979 oneminute videos “made by you(th) around the world”. 60 second video for a (self)-portrait They will be organising, in collaboration with the European Cultural Foundation and Makan house in Jordan a workshop in Amman, from January 25th to 29th. It will be open for youngsters 12-20 living in Egypt, Lebanon, Syria and Jordan.

The theme of the workshop will be (self)-portrait, in order to learn more about the views, opinions and concerns of young people living in the Middle-east.

The videos will be shown on local television station and festivals across Europe. And the best video will win a trip to Amsterdam or Tokyo.

If you live in one of the above mentioned countries, are between ages of 12-20 years, you can fill the application online from the Makanhouse Website.
(18/01/2007)

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