Israeli and Arab Writers to Meet in Sheikh Hussein Bridge

  Israeli and Arab Writers to Meet in Sheikh Hussein Bridge Israeli, Palestinian and Arab writers from around the world will meet at the Sheikh Hussein Bridge on Tuesday, February 15, 2005 for a unique literary gathering. The Bridge, which is an international crossing point between Israel and Jordan, serves as a powerful symbol of hope, a link to understanding and a passageway over conflict.
January 31, 2005, Sheikh Hussein Bridge Israeli and Arab Writers to Meet in Sheikh Hussein Bridge The one-day encounter is a brainchild of international publishers and cultural institutions that work with authors from the Middle East, and has been coordinated by Deborah Harris of the Harris-Elon Agency, Israel. With the goal of providing a dynamic platform for sharing views and experiences, an opportunity for voices from both sides of the bridge to be heard, some 50 writers and 100 publishers have confirmed their participation thus far. Among the writers attending the event are Leila Sebbar and Chaled Fouad Allam, Algeria; Ahmet Altan, Turkey; Abdel Kader Benali, Morocco; Jaber Yassin Hussein, Iraq; and A.B. Yehoshua, David Grossman, Sayed Kashua, Yehudit Katzir and Alona Kimhi, Israel. Israeli and Arab Writers to Meet in Sheikh Hussein Bridge Samir el-Youssef, Palestinian writer attending from London, said, "Only by meeting each other can we, Palestinians and Israelis, truly know how close or distant we really are; how easy or difficult it will be to live together. We don't have the luxury of avoiding this encounter; it is the duty of Palestinian and Israeli intellectuals and writers to gain such knowledge and render the experience for our communities." Israeli writer Etgar Keret, also participating, said, "If we, writers from both sides, can't find the empathy, or the imagination, to see the other and to try and understand the other, then who will?" Babelmed Editorial Team

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