Yuba and its star

 

Yuba and its star
Yuba. (Photo : R. Tacheroune)

Yuba was born and raised in Dcheira, a small town near Agadir (Southern Morocco). He was greatly affected by the way in which his Amazigh (Berber) culture was slowly but surely being strangled and so joined the identity protest movement to try and contribute, in his own way, to the defence and protection of this thousand-year-old culture.

He then wrote poems in Amazigh and began to play guitar and formed a group, as he was convinced that music was a way of fighting for what was right.
In 2000, his first album, Tawargit (Dream) met with resounding success in Morocco. His second album, Itran Azal (Stars in the Daytime), was recorded both in Germany and Morocco and came out in 2005, using traditional instruments.

We can find the words of his songs translated in English and French on his website: in this way, you’ll discover how his nostalgic songs are touched at the same time by tradition and actual politic engagement.
 


 

Babelmed Editorial Team
(26/09/2006)

 

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